Multimedia

    Faces of Racial Profiling: BCC's Wesley Morris Shares Experience with Racial Profiling

     In this latest installment of the Faces of Racial Profiling video series, Wesley Morris of the Beloved Community Center (BCC), a social justice organization, in Gre...[Read more]

    Community News

    Visit Your Member of Congress during August Recess

    Join the immigrant rights and racial justice movements mobilizing across the country at this important time! Tell your Members of Congress that we need strong federal legislation to ban racial profiling. Urge you...[Read more]

    Be a road tripper for our future

    New York City is gearing up for immigration reform so make sure you don’t get left behind. Starting this week, calendars are marked with events to mobilize our elected officials behind immigration reform in 2010.

    It’s that time again to talk about racial profiling

    There can be victories in the fight to stop racial profiling. But we need communities to come together and speak out against it.
    For starters, you can have a conversation along with thousands of others on February 22 and Face the Truth about racial profiling.

    An overwhelmed immigration court system takes away due process

    That’s Judge Dana Marks, President of the National Association of Immigration Judges, and someone who is an immigration judge day in and day out, speaking out  for an Article I Court or an independent court system for immigration cases.

    Is the criminal justice system “The New Jim Crow”?

    Jarvious Cotton’s great-great-grandfather could not vote as a slave. His great-grandfather was beaten to death by the Klu Klux Klan for attempting to vote. His grandfather was prevented from voting by Klan intimidation; his father was barred by poll taxes and literacy tests. Today, Cotton cannot vote because he, like many black men in the United States, has been labeled a felon and is currently on parole. – From ‘The New Jim Crow’.

    Is the Tea Party’s racist rhetoric going to save broken families?

    While it is difficult to find much coherence within the fractured and fast-changing Tea Party Movement, a look at their convention in Nashville last week shows that the issue of immigration seems to have gained greater popularity, emerging largely from the links made between immigration and the healthcare debate at their town hall meetings held last summer.